D'var Torah for Purim

written by: Renana Shalom, who becomes a Bat Mitzvah this Shabbat, 3/4/17

 

The Talmud states  "משנכנס אדר מרבין בשמחה" “as soon as Adar begins, one should increase joy”. But why? What is the sense in commanding joy and happiness? Today, as I turn 12 and become Bat Mitzvah, I would like to invite you on a journey to discover the unleashed power behind the Mitzvah of Simcha (joy) that our sages have commanded us.

 

Rabbi Nachman of Breslav writes the following:

“The essence of having inner peace and settling one’s mind is acquired with happiness, because with happiness, one can lead the mind per his own will, as happiness is the world of freedom, thus when one ties happiness to his mind, then his mind is in freedom and not in exile. Also, one should embrace oneself in whatever possible to find happiness, and especially try hard to find a good quality about himself to find that happiness…”

 

In the world we live in, there may be a concept that depth of thought and creativity comes bundled with hardness, sadness and despair. In the world of our sages, Chazal, it is the complete opposite. In order for one to receive Ruach Hakodesh (holy spirit from Hashem), one must be deeply endowed in happiness.

 

An example for this approach may be demonstrated via the world of dance. When a person is sad, it is well-recognized in the way he dances and carries himself on the dance floor, if he even dances at all. He is confined and distant, and enclosed in faraway world. Whereas, the happy person is open, inviting, connecting with the people around him and interacting with people on the dance floor. The happiness opens a gate for another world, or worlds, and helps us understand, receive, think and step outside of ourselves and be elevated.

 

The source of happiness is the trust in Hashem. He who puts his complete trust in Hashem can see that whatever he has in life was not just given to him from Hashem, but also tailored exactly to his needs, and fit him best. Thus, one should feel appreciation for the opportunity to learn the Torah and fulfil the Mitzvot given by Hashem, as these will lead him to ultimate happiness and joy.

 

We learn this incredible life lesson in simply 5 words in Masechet Avot:

"איזה הוא עשיר--השמח בחלקו" “Who is rich – he who is happy with his share”. Only he who truly believes that what Hashem entitled him to in this world is the very best possible for him, can reach the level of true and honest happiness.

 

On Purim, which we will be celebrating in one week, we are commanded with 4 Mitzvot which were meant to bring us special joy on this magnificent holiday. In each of these Mitzvot, the happiness is expressed in a different way.

 

The first Mitzvah is reading the Megillah, in which word Simcha (joy) is a very dominant one and shows up 5 times. This notion constructs the path in which the essence of Purim is taken through and built around.

 

The second Mitzvah is feast. The last Rabbi of Chabad wrote the following: Purim is different from Chanukah as it is “a day of feast and joy”. In Purim one must feast and the happiness is tied to earthly matters (such as food and wine). The reason for this is because that the Greek decree upon the Jews in Chanukah was meant to oppress the Jewish soul and spirit, "להשכיחם תורתך ולהעבירם מחוקי רצונך", whereas Haman’s decree was mainly meant to annihilate the Jewish people, and make the Jews extinct, "להשמיד להרוג ולאבד את כל היהודים מנער ועד זקן טף ונשים" Hence, the joy in Purim is also the joy of the body.

 

The third Mitzvah is Mishloach Manot. Rabbi Ovadia Yosef writes the following about Mishloach Manot: It is done in order for one to show his love and affection for his friend, and by sending gifts and presents, one expresses this emotion of care and fondness, and instills emotions of love, peace and friendship with his friend. When one treats his friend in such way, he will most certainly receive the same treatment, as this is the human nature, and the purpose of the holy Torah, to spread peace in the world, and by that spread more happiness and joy.

 

The fourth Mitzvah is Matanot Laevyonim (gifts to those in need).

The Rambam explains that if the choice is offered, it is better to increase efforts in the Mitzvah of gifts to the needy than Mishloach Manot or feast, and to use resources to give more Tzedakah, rather than have a bigger feast or send a better present to peers. The reason is because the ultimate joy comes from giving happiness to those in need. As Hashem himself is taking care of the poor and needy and by making them happy, one is taking upon the ways of Hashem.

 

The very act of giving and making someone happy, enables one with extraordinary inner joy and allows for a true elevation of spirit and soul.

In this day, I accept the not the burden but the gift of Mitzvot. I pray to Hashem that as the Mitzvot of Purim are set to bring us happiness and joy in this beautiful Chag, so will fulfilling the rest of the Mitzvot bring me happiness and joy in every step of my way as part of the Jewish nation.

 

Shabbat Shalom.

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 20 October 2017